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Leavitt & Scher Dental Group
5867 Mayfield Rd
Mayfield Heights, OH 44124
440-442-3262

Posts for: August, 2014

By Leavitt Dental Group
August 29, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition  
TheSweetandLowdownonSugarSubstitutes

We’ve all heard about potentially negative health effects from the sugar that’s added to many of our favorite foods. So these days, lots of us are trying to cut down on our consumption of sugar — not only to lose weight, but also to help prevent maladies like diabetes and heart disease. We can’t help noticing those pastel-colored packets — pink, yellow and blue — on the rack of our favorite coffee shop. But now we’re wondering: Are those sugar substitutes a good alternative to natural sugar? And which one should we choose?

Artificial sweeteners have been around for decades. Six different types (including the ones in the colorful packets) are currently approved as safe by the Food and Drug Administration; a couple of older ones (notably cyclamates) have been banned for many years. In addition to those zero-calorie sugar substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners called sugar alcohols (for example, mannitol and xylitol) are often used as food ingredients. So what’s the difference between them — and which one is best?

That’s not so easy to answer. If you have a rare genetic condition called phenylketonuria, you should avoid aspartame (the blue packet), because your body can’t process the substance. Otherwise, the choice may come down to a matter of taste. Even though they are FDA-approved, some controversy (both fact-based and far-fetched) remains about the long-term safety of sugar substitutes, and their usefulness in preventing obesity and other diseases.

Yet it’s clear that for some people, the consequences of consuming too much sugar could be much worse. So if you’re at risk for diabetes or certain other diseases, sugar substitutes can be an important tool in maintaining a healthier diet. They also have another health benefit: sugar substitutes don’t cause cavities. Further, some sugar alcohols (xylitol in particular) have the property of stimulating saliva flow, and have been shown to actually impede the formation of cavities. Oral health is an important (if sometimes overlooked) component of your general well-being, and several studies have pointed to a link between oral and systemic diseases — for example, diabetes and heart disease.

As with so many aspects of our health, there seems to be no “magic bullet” to cure all our diet-related problems. But used in moderation, artificial sweeteners can be a valuable part of the effort to improve our overall health and well-being. For more information on this topic, see the Dear Doctor article “Artificial Sweeteners.”


ForMichaelBubletheShowMustGoOnEvenWithouttheTooth

What happens if you’re right in the middle of a song, in front of an arena full of fans… and you knock out a tooth with your microphone? If you’re Michael Buble, you don’t stop the show — you just keep right on singing.

The Canadian song stylist was recently performing at the Allphones Arena in Sydney, Australia, when an ill-timed encounter with the mike resulted in the loss of one of his teeth. But he didn’t let on to his dental dilemma, and finished the concert without a pause. The next day, Buble revealed the injury to his fans on his Instagram page, with a picture of himself in the dentist’s chair, and a note: “Don’t worry, I’m at the dentist getting fixed up for my final show tonight.”

Buble’s not the only singer who has had a close encounter with a mike: Country chanteuse Taylor Swift and pop star Demi Lovato, among others, have injured their teeth on stage. Fortunately, contemporary dentistry can take care of problems like this quickly and painlessly. So when you’ve got to get back before the public eye, what’s the best (and speediest) way to fix a chipped or broken tooth?

It depends on exactly what’s wrong. If it’s a small chip, cosmetic bonding might be the answer. Bonding uses special tooth-colored resins that mimic the natural shade and luster of your teeth. The whole procedure is done right here in the dental office, usually in just one visit. However, bonding isn’t as long-lasting as some other tooth-restoration methods, and it can’t fix large chips or breaks.

If a tooth’s roots are intact, a crown (or cap) can be used to replace the entire visible part. The damaged tooth is fitted for a custom-fabricated replacement, which is usually made in a dental laboratory and then attached at a subsequent visit (though it can sometimes be fabricated with high-tech machinery right in the office).

If the roots aren’t viable, you may have the option of a bridge or a dental implant. With a fixed bridge, the prosthetic tooth is supported by crowns that are placed on healthy teeth on either side of the gap. The bridge itself is a one-piece unit consisting of the replacement tooth plus the adjacent crowns.

In contrast, a high-tech dental implant is a replacement tooth that’s supported not by your other teeth, but by a screw-like post of titanium metal, which is inserted into the jaw in a minor surgical procedure. Dental implants have the highest success rate of any tooth-replacement method (over 95 percent); they help preserve the quality of bone on the jaw; and they don’t result in weakening the adjacent, healthy teeth — which makes implants the treatment of choice for many people.

So whether you’re crooning for ten thousand adoring fans or just singing in the shower, there's no reason to let a broken tooth stop the show: Talk to us about your tooth-restoration options! If you would like additional information, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Repairing Chipped Teeth” and “Dental Implants vs. Bridgework.”


By Leavitt Dental Group
August 01, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
FrequentlyAskedQuestionsaboutFixedDentures

Q: Is there much of a difference between fixed and removable dentures?
A: There’s a BIG difference! Removable dentures are the type your grandparents might have had — and possibly their grandparents, too. They work well enough after you get used to them, but there’s always the issue of slippage, poor fit, limited function… and potential embarrassment. Modern fixed dentures, however, get their stability from today’s state-of-the-art system for tooth replacement: dental implants. They won’t loosen or slip, they function and “feel” like your own natural teeth, and they can last for years and years to come.

Q: How are fixed dentures supported?
A: Each arch (set of teeth comprising the top or bottom jaw) of a fixed denture is anchored into the jaw bone by four or more dental implants. These small screw-like devices, made of titanium metal, are placed into the jawbone in a minor surgical procedure. Once set in place, they remain permanently attached by both mechanical forces and osseointegration — the process in which living bone cells actually become fused with the metal implants themselves.

Q: What is the procedure for getting dental implants like?
A: Before having any work done, you will receive a thorough examination and have a set of diagnostic images made. Implant surgery is normally performed in the dental office, using local anesthesia or conscious sedation. If any failing teeth must be extracted (removed), that will be done first. Next, small openings are made in the gums and the jawbone, and the implants are placed in precise locations. Sometimes, a set of temporary teeth can be attached to the implants immediately; other times, the implants will be allowed to heal for a period of time.

Q: Besides added stability, are there other advantages to fixed dentures?
A: Yes! As they become integrated in the jaw, dental implants actually help preserve the quantity and quality of bone in the jaw; removable dentures, on the other hand, decrease bone quantity and quality. This is important because the jawbone plays a vital role in supporting facial features like lips and cheeks. When the facial features lose support, it can make a person look prematurely aged. Also, people who wear removable dentures often have trouble eating “challenging” foods like raw fruits and vegetables (which are highly nutritious), and opt for softer, more processed (and less nutritious) foods. With fixed dentures, however, you can eat the foods you like.

Q: Aren't fixed dentures with dental implants more expensive?
A: Initially, the answer is yes — but in the long run, they may not be. Unlike removable dentures, which inevitably need to be re-lined or remade as the jawbone shrinks, fixed dentures can last for the rest of your life. They don’t require adhesives or creams, and you will never have to take them out at night and clean them. In fact, you can think of them as a long-term investment in yourself that pays off with a better quality of life!

If you’d like more information on fixed dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Your Best Option for Replacing Missing Teeth.”